.NET people make everything so difficult

I do lots and lots of development with the .NET platform, mainly because the corporations in the Cleveland area that have money to fund large projects are Microsoft shops.

I used to have a real problem with Microsoft development, back when it was all Windows 95; the tools were expensive, flaky, and unreliable. Since then, the tools have improved to an amazing degree; now I can write code that actually works consistently on more than one computer, and it’s not utterly ridiculous to run Windows on servers anymore. So there’s that.

But in just the last couple of days, I’ve gotten back into the Ruby on Rails environment. Partly, I’m jamming with my college homie Dave Stagner on his amazing Congruence product; and also, I had to update this old Perl script that I’ve been using for years to sort my incoming email.

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The W part of DTSTTCPW

When developing iteratively, what exactly constitutes premature optimization? When doing the simplest thing that could possibly work, what does it mean to “work”?

A couple of weeks ago, a question turned up on the BaseCamp site we use to coordinate one of my projects. One programmer asked what we thought of a certain calculation he was setting up on the database. It had to do with accumulating “rating” points of an item in a tree-shaped threaded discussion.

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