Access: Why not?

I don’t suppose Access is ever the only solution to a problem. But in my experience it’s frequently a reasonable one and it spares a lot of drama over acquiring and installing a database engine.

I blogged a few times recently about ways to make Acess databases do kind of what you want when you’re programming with .NET. There was this one about multiple JOIN syntax. Then this one about “parameter” errors. And finally this one about weird column names. Yuck!

Continue reading “Access: Why not?”

Programming with Access? Know this about column names

Does your Access database have sketchy column names with weird characters in them? Surround them with bracket characters so SQL will work.

Because it’s the beginning of the week, I’m again presenting more about programming .NET with an Access database.

Last week, I offered help with a confusing syntax error. Before that, I demonstrated the unique way Access handles JOIN. Today I have a tip on addressing poorly named columns in your code. Continue reading “Programming with Access? Know this about column names”

Programming with Access? Know this about "No value given for one or more required parameters"

Today, it’s more about programming .NET with an Access database. Last time, I explained the unique way Access handles JOIN. This time, let’s talk about a syntax error that masquerades as a missing parameter.

Continue reading “Programming with Access? Know this about "No value given for one or more required parameters"”

Programming with Access? Know this about JOIN.

Writing your own SQL statements against an Access database can fail in surprising ways. Here’s how to avoid one common problem: the three-way JOIN that won’t execute.

If you’ve ever implemented a small-scale WinForms .NET project with modest database needs, you’ve probably been tempted to keep it “simple” by using Microsoft Acess (.mdb) files.

Continue reading “Programming with Access? Know this about JOIN.”